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Prairie Dog Empire

Prairie Dog Empire PDF Author: Paul A. Johnsgard
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803226047
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 243
Book Description
For hundreds of years black-tailed prairie dogs inhabited the Great Plains by the millions, improving the grazing for bison and pronghorn antelope, digging escape holes and homes for burrowing owls and rodents, and serving as prey for badgers, coyotes, hawks, and bobcats. This book by the renowned naturalist and writer Paul A. Johnsgard tells the complex biological and environmental story of the western Great Plains under the prairie dog?s reign?and then under a brief but devastating century of human dominion. ø An indispensable and highly readable introduction to the ecosystem of the shortgrass prairie, Prairie Dog Empire describes in clear and detailed terms the habitat and habits of black-tailed prairie dogs; their subsistence, seasonal behavior, and the makeup of their vast colonies; and the ways in which their ?towns? transform the surrounding terrain?for better or worse. Johnsgard recounts how this terrain was in turn transformed over the past century by the destruction of prairie dogs and their grassland habitats, together with the removal of the bison and their replacement with domestic livestock. A disturbing look at profound ecological alterations in the environment, this book also offers a rare and invaluable close-up view of the rich history and threatened future of the creature once considered the ?keystone? species of the western plains. ø Included are maps, drawings, and listings of more than two hundred natural grassland preserves where many of the region?s native plants and animals may still be seen and studied.

Prairie Dog Empire

Prairie Dog Empire PDF Author: Paul A. Johnsgard
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803226047
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 243
Book Description
For hundreds of years black-tailed prairie dogs inhabited the Great Plains by the millions, improving the grazing for bison and pronghorn antelope, digging escape holes and homes for burrowing owls and rodents, and serving as prey for badgers, coyotes, hawks, and bobcats. This book by the renowned naturalist and writer Paul A. Johnsgard tells the complex biological and environmental story of the western Great Plains under the prairie dog?s reign?and then under a brief but devastating century of human dominion. ø An indispensable and highly readable introduction to the ecosystem of the shortgrass prairie, Prairie Dog Empire describes in clear and detailed terms the habitat and habits of black-tailed prairie dogs; their subsistence, seasonal behavior, and the makeup of their vast colonies; and the ways in which their ?towns? transform the surrounding terrain?for better or worse. Johnsgard recounts how this terrain was in turn transformed over the past century by the destruction of prairie dogs and their grassland habitats, together with the removal of the bison and their replacement with domestic livestock. A disturbing look at profound ecological alterations in the environment, this book also offers a rare and invaluable close-up view of the rich history and threatened future of the creature once considered the ?keystone? species of the western plains. ø Included are maps, drawings, and listings of more than two hundred natural grassland preserves where many of the region?s native plants and animals may still be seen and studied.

Waiting for Coyote's Call

Waiting for Coyote's Call PDF Author: Jerry Wilson
Publisher: SDSHS Press
ISBN: 0977795586
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 284
Book Description
Inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Annie Dillard, Jerry Wilson’s eco-memoir Waiting for Coyote’s Call covers twenty-five years of trying to live life leaving as small an environmental footprint as possible. Wilson encourages readers to think about their place in nature through his family’s quest to live equably with the natural world on 160 acres of prairie and woodland near the Missouri River in South Dakota. Wilson chronicles how he built their eco-friendly solar home and set about returning the plowed-under prairie to its original state. He muses on the difficulties of doing this in the modern world, where time is ever-more precious and convenience often outweighs the benefits of traditional methods of life. Taking the reader on journeys through his “Big Woods,” Wilson examines the wonder of the creatures that also make their home on the “North Forty,” noting how all that life fits together. From delight in home-grown tomatoes and passing Sandhill cranes to fears about humans’ interaction with the web of life, Wilson’s twenty-five years on the Missouri River bluff spring off the page, mirroring the fawns’ leaps and bounds viewed from his window.

Wild Again

Wild Again PDF Author: David S. Jachowski
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520958160
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 256
Book Description
This engaging personal account of one of America's most contested wildlife conservation campaigns has as its central character the black-footed ferret. Once feared extinct, and still one of North America's rarest mammals, the black-footed ferret exemplifies the ecological, social, and political challenges of conservation in the West, including the risks involved with intensive captive breeding and reintroduction to natural habitat. David Jachowski draws on more than a decade of experience working to save the ferret. His unique perspective and informative anecdotes reveal the scientific and human aspects of conservation as well as the immense dedication required to protect a species on the edge of extinction. By telling one story of conservation biology in practice—its routine work, triumphs, challenges, and inevitable conflicts—this book gives readers a greater understanding of the conservation ethic that emerged on the Great Plains as part of one of the most remarkable recovery efforts in the history of the Endangered Species Act.

Finding Beauty in a Broken World

Finding Beauty in a Broken World PDF Author: Terry Tempest Williams
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307377784
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 432
Book Description
"Shards of glass can cut and wound or magnify a vision," Terry Tempest Williams tells us. "Mosaic celebrates brokenness and the beauty of being brought together." Ranging from Ravenna, Italy, where she learns the ancient art of mosaic, to the American Southwest, where she observes prairie dogs on the brink of extinction, to a small village in Rwanda where she joins genocide survivors to build a memorial from the rubble of war, Williams searches for meaning and community in an era of physical and spiritual fragmentation. In her compassionate meditation on how nature and humans both collide and connect, Williams affirms a reverence for all life, and constructs a narrative of hopeful acts, taking that which is broken and creating something whole.

Trash Animals

Trash Animals PDF Author: Kelsi Nagy
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816686742
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 320
Book Description
Why are some species admired or beloved while others are despised? An eagle or hawk circling overhead inspires awe while urban pigeons shuffling underfoot are kicked away in revulsion. Fly fishermen consider carp an unwelcome trash fish, even though the trout they hope to catch are often equally non-native. Wolves and coyotes are feared and hunted in numbers wildly disproportionate to the dangers they pose to humans and livestock. In Trash Animals, a diverse group of environmental writers explores the natural history of wildlife species deemed filthy, unwanted, invasive, or worthless, highlighting the vexed relationship humans have with such creatures. Each essay focuses on a so-called trash species—gulls, coyotes, carp, cockroaches, magpies, prairie dogs, and lubber grasshoppers, among others—examining the biology and behavior of each in contrast to the assumptions widely held about them. Identifying such animals as trash tells us nothing about problematic wildlife but rather reveals more about human expectations of, and frustrations with, the natural world. By establishing the unique place that maligned species occupy in the contemporary landscape and in our imagination, the contributors challenge us to look closely at these animals, to reimagine our ethics of engagement with such wildlife, and to question the violence with which we treat them. Perhaps our attitudes reveal more about humans than they do about the animals. Contributors: Bruce Barcott; Charles Bergman, Pacific Lutheran U; James E. Bishop, Young Harris College; Andrew D. Blechman; Michael P. Branch, U of Nevada, Reno; Lisa Couturier; Carolyn Kraus, U of Michigan–Dearborn; Jeffrey A. Lockwood, U of Wyoming; Kyhl Lyndgaard, Marlboro College; Charles Mitchell, Elmira College; Kathleen D. Moore, Oregon State U; Catherine Puckett; Bernard Quetchenbach, Montana State U, Billings; Christina Robertson, U of Nevada, Reno; Gavan P. L. Watson, U of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

As Far as the Eye Could Reach

As Far as the Eye Could Reach PDF Author: Phyllis S. Morgan
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806153008
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 240
Book Description
Travelers and traders taking the Santa Fe Trail’s routes from Missouri to New Mexico wrote vivid eyewitness accounts of the diverse and abundant wildlife encountered as they crossed arid plains, high desert, and rugged mountains. Most astonishing to these observers were the incredible numbers of animals, many they had not seen before—buffalo, antelope (pronghorn), prairie dogs, roadrunners, mustangs, grizzlies, and others. They also wrote about the domesticated animals they brought with them, including oxen, mules, horses, and dogs. Their letters, diaries, and memoirs open a window onto an animal world on the plains seen by few people other than the Plains Indians who had lived there for thousands of years. Phyllis S. Morgan has gleaned accounts from numerous primary sources and assembled them into a delightfully informative narrative. She has also explored the lives of the various species, and in this book tells about their behaviors and characteristics, the social relations within and between species, their relationships with humans, and their contributions to the environment and humankind. With skillful prose and a keen eye for a priceless tale, Morgan reanimates the story of life on the Santa Fe Trail’s well-worn routes, and its sometimes violent intersection with human life. She provides a stirring view of the land and of the animals visible “as far as the eye could reach,” as more than one memoirist described. She also champions the many contributions animals made to the Trail’s success and to the opening of the American West.

Island of Grass

Island of Grass PDF Author: Ellen E. Wohl
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1457109719
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 224
Book Description
Island of Grass tells the story of the Cathy Fromme Prairie Natural Area, a 240-acre preserve surrounded by housing developments in Fort Collins, Colorado. This small grassland is a remnant of the once-vast prairies of the West that early European explorers and settlers described as seas of grass. Agricultural land use and urban expansion during the past two centuries have fragmented and altered these prairies. All that remains today are small islands. These remnants cannot support some of the larger animals that once roamed the prairie, but they continue to support a diverse array of plants and animals and can still teach us much about grassland ecology. Through her examinations of daily changes during walks across the Fromme Prairie over the course of a year, Ellen Wohl explores one of the more neglected ecosystems in North America, describing the geology, soils, climate, ecology, and natural history of the area, as well as providing glimpses into the lives of the plants, animals, and microbes inhabiting this landscape. Although small in size, pieces of preserved shortgrass prairie like the Cathy Fromme Prairie Natural Area are rich, diverse, and accessible natural environments deserving of awareness, appreciation, and protection. Anyone concerned with the ecology and conservation of grasslands in general, the ecology and conservation of open space in urban areas, or the natural history of Colorado will be interested in this book.

Wildlife of Nebraska

Wildlife of Nebraska PDF Author: Paul A. Johnsgard
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 1496222962
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
Book Description


Morning Comes to Elk Mountain

Morning Comes to Elk Mountain PDF Author: Gary Lantz
Publisher: University of North Texas Press
ISBN: 1574415271
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 272
Book Description
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Texas Monthly

Texas Monthly PDF Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 160
Book Description
Since 1973, TEXAS MONTHLY has chronicled life in contemporary Texas, reporting on vital issues such as politics, the environment, industry, and education. As a leisure guide, TEXAS MONTHLY continues to be the indispensable authority on the Texas scene, covering music, the arts, travel, restaurants, museums, and cultural events with its insightful recommendations.